Uzbekistan Recent History

Islom Karimov: The first President of independent Uzbekistan (1938-2016)

Islom Abduganiewitsch Karimov was born on January 30, 1938 in Samarkand. After attending school, he first studied mechanical engineering at the Central Asian Polytechnic Institute in Tashkent and then economics at the Institute for National Economy. In 1960 he worked as an engineer in an agricultural machinery combine, from 1961 to 1966 in an aviation production company, where he was promoted to chief designer. In 1966, Karimov, who had since joined the Communist Party of Uzbekistan, moved to the State Planning Commission of the Uzbek SSR, where he became the first deputy head of this authority. From 1983 to 1986 Karimov held the post of Minister of Finance of the Uzbek SSR. In 1986 he became Deputy Prime Minister and Chairman of the Planning Commission. Until 1989, Karimov served as the first party secretary in the Kashkadarja (Qashqadaryo) region in the south of the country, and in June became the first secretary of the Uzbek Communist Party. On March 24, 1990, the Supreme Soviet of the Uzbek SSR elected him to the newly created office of President of the Uzbek SSR. After the Moscow coup, Karimov declared the sovereignty of Uzbekistan on August 31, 1991. Almost four months later he was elected the first president of the independent republic. After his re-election, his term of office was extended by five years in a 2005 referendum. In January 2000, the population voted again for him, and his term of office was extended to seven years by referendum. Although the constitution only provides for two terms, he ran Almost four months later he was elected the first president of the independent republic. After his re-election, his term of office was extended by five years in a 2005 referendum. In January 2000, the population voted again for him, and his term of office was extended to seven years by referendum. Although the constitution only provides for two terms, he ran Almost four months later he was elected the first president of the independent republic. After his re-election, his term of office was extended by five years in a 2005 referendum. In January 2000, the population voted again for him, and his term of office was extended to seven years by referendum. Although the constitution only provides for two terms, he ran. Karimov was approved for the third time in December 2007 by the state electoral commission and was confirmed as president by an overwhelming majority.

In her very polemical article under the title “This is why this tyrant has┬áso many important friends” (original title: ” Islam Karimov: the tyrant everyone is dying to woo”), the author addresses the question of why President Karimov has been with the It was able to hold power and comes to the conclusion that this would not be possible without its energetic supporters from western countries.

Uzbekistan President Islom Karimov

State flag & coat of arms and national anthem of Uzbekistan

The most important state symbols were either designed by the first President Islam Karimov, who died at the end of August 2016, personally (the state flag and the state coat of arms), or (the national anthem) was written and composed under his significant influence. In a detailed interview, the then president explained the symbolism of the state flag as follows: blue, the favorite color of the Uzbeks (many house facades, especially in the provinces, are often painted blue) and other Turkic peoples, stands for the sky; White is supposed to symbolize justice; Green stands for the Islamic faith of the Uzbek people (later the Islamic connotation was no longer mentioned in the course of the fight against Islamist terrorism and green is now a symbol of the country’s hospitality) and the thin red stripes are intended to indicate the strength of the people. The waning (“old”) crescent moon, which was presumably taken over thoughtfully on the basis of the Turkish state flag, refers to Islam (?!) of the predominantly Muslim population and represents the rebirth (?!) of the country. To explain: The Islamic crescent is always an increasing (“new”) one. The twelve stars are interpreted in two ways: in one they stand for the twelve provinces (Viloyatlar), in the other interpretation for the twelve-year cycle of an ancient (Chinese) calendar, which is also common in Central Asia.

The national coat of arms is circular. Of course, the “national colors” blue, white and green dominate here. In the middle, a Xumo / Simurgh / Phoenix flaps its wings and is supposed to symbolize rebirth or freedom. On the left is a cotton plant and on the right ears of wheat are wrapped around the coat of arms (a very Soviet one appearing representation). In the upper part of the coat of arms is the crescent moon symbol in a field, the shape of which is derived from the symbol Rub al-hizb used in the Koran. This indicates the religion of Islam, to which the majority of the population profess. According to businesscarriers, the bright future of Uzbekistan is shown in the background. The rising sun over the mountains is supposed to symbolize this future. The two roads represent the two main rivers in the country – Amu Darya and Syr Darya.